Posts Tagged ‘HuffingtonPost’


Huffington Post Article: When Divorcing a Narcissist, Prepare for the Rage

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

When Divorcing a Narcissist, Prepare for the Rage

By: Lindsey Ellison at Huffington Post 

When you first met your narcissist, you probably once viewed him as a majesty who could give you the keys to his fairytale kingdom. His charm, wit and charismatic personality won you over, because you so badly craved a prince charming to save you. Conversely, your needing a prince charming is exactly what attracted him to you, as it gave him the opportunity to validate his narcissistic fantasies of himself, that he is, indeed, a fairytale prince.

But now that you’re married, your prince charming has turned into a monster, and his once magical kingdom is now your inescapable cage.

Two things may happen: You will stay in the marriage and endure many more years of abuse, to the point where your low self-esteem tells you there are no other options. Or, you will have had enough and decide to divorce him.

The latter (in which you divorce him) may be the first time in your life where you are setting boundaries. You have come to the conclusion that you deserve better and you refuse to tolerate bad behavior.

But this one victorious act of boundary setting is what makes for a potentially horrific divorce. Few victims are prepared for it, and their lack of preparation can cost them thousands of dollars in attorney fees, leaving them broke and emotionally drained.

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Huffington Post Article: 16 Reasons To Be Grateful For Divorce (Yes, Divorce)

Thursday, December 4th, 2014

16 Reasons To Be Grateful For Divorce (Yes, Divorce)

By: Brittany Wong at Huffington Post 

Divorce may seem like an odd thing to be grateful for this Thanksgiving. But as plenty of HuffPost Divorce readers and bloggers will tell you, nothing forces you to reevaluate your priorities quite like a split.

Below, they share the new relationships, opportunities and strengthened bonds with their kids that made their divorces entirely worth the trouble.

1. “I am thankful to be able to breathe again. I no longer walk on eggshells.” -Tamara W.

2. “My divorce made me a stronger, more secure woman. I had no idea until after the divorce was final what an impact his hostility had on me. To be honest, divorcing him was the best decision I’ve ever made.” -Teresa F.

3. “I’m grateful I have sole custody of my daughter! I have raised her myself for seven years now. I wouldn’t change a thing. I found out what kind of man and father I was because of my divorce. It was the best thing that could have happened to me.” -Doug S.

4. “I’m thankful for my divorce because through it I learned the truth of the saying, ‘Sometimes good things have to fall apart so that better things can come together.’ Nearly five years after my first marriage failed, I’m a blissful newlywed of three weeks! He is -– and we are –- so much better than I could have imagined.” -Penney Berryman

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Huffington Post Article: What I Told My Daughter When She Asked Why Dad Left

Tuesday, November 25th, 2014

What I Told My Daughter When She Asked Why Dad Left

By: Eden Strong from Tango.com at Huffington Post

“Mommy, why did Daddy leave us?”

I feel my heart breaking as I look into her big brown eyes, tears brimming to the edges but not yet spilling over, eyes wide with the hope that maybe, just maybe this time, my answer will be different.

I love you. I am so sorry that daddy made a choice that hurt us when he left, but this was not your fault. He is not a bad person, he just made a bad choice that hurt a lot of people and I am really sorry that it hurt you. I love you. I love you more than any daddy ever will because I will always love you the most.”

That’s what I said, but what I wanted to say, what was rolling around in my brain and filling up my heart in ways that hurt so much I was sure my heart might actually explode, sounded more like this:

“Daddy left us because he is selfish. He left because he never should have had kids in the first place. I wish every day that he could see the damage that he has done to you, the damage that he has done to our family. He is a horrible excuse for a human being, he is a waste of working organs, I hope we never see him again, and quite frankly we are all better off now that he is gone.”

But really, what do you say to the wide eyes brimming with tears that are looking up to you? What do you say to a child who carries half the DNA of a person that causes your heart the daily battle of learning to forgive?

You assure her that she is loved. No matter how much you want to, no matter how deep the anger runs, you do not talk poorly about him. You assure her that the person that gave her half of her DNA is not a bad person, that she does not have evil in her. You acknowledge that she is hurting, you acknowledge that what happened is causing her pain. Because she just wants to be heard.

You be honest — that you don’t have all the answers, that you wish you could make things better but that you can’t. You let her know that it is okay to be upset and that you will always be there when she wants to talk. You remind her on a near constant basis of how wonderful she is, reinforcing that her father did not walk away from her because of anything that she did.

You tell her the most honest and powerful truth that you have which is this: That to the ends of the earth, to the sky and beyond, that you love her and that you will spend the rest of your life loving her enough for the one that is missing. You assure her that you will never leave her because every minute you get to spend with her is a blessing.

You tell her that daddy may have left, but thankfully when he did, he left the best part of him behind.


In Huffington Post’s re-posted article “What I Told My Daughter When She Asked Why Dad LeftMs. Strong from Tango.com shares with us what she told her daughter when her dad left the family.  There are so many things you want to say and finding the right words, the words that will help your children, are sometimes difficult to come by.  She explains what she said and why she said it, and she was right on the mark.  Reinforcing that they are loved is the best way to handle a situation such as divorce.
 
If you or someone you know needs guidance in a divorce or custody matter, please contact our office so that we can help assist you through what can be one of the most difficult times in one’s life, especially where there are children involved.
 
Law Offices of Steven B. Chroman, P. C. Santa Clarita Divorce
Call 661-255-1800 for your free initial consultation.

Huffington Post Article: 10 Painless Ways To Change Your Messy, Messy Habits

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

10 Painless Ways To Change Your Messy, Messy Habits

By: Brie Dyas with Huffington Post

If you’re the type who considers the act of maintaining an organized (and spotless) home a waste of time, prepare to have your world rocked. “Clean people” know that you don’t have to devote hours upon hours to keep your living space from becoming a chaotic mess. You just have to adopt a few simple habits that can be painlessly incorporated into your daily routine. We caught up with Jolie Kerr, author of “My Boyfriend Barfed In My Handbag…And Other Things You Can’t Ask Martha” (Penguin, 2014) and our favorite expert on all things clean, about the foolproof ways to avoid a life lived among cat-sized dust bunnies. These tips can’t completely undo a lifetime of bad habits, but they’re a very easy start. We’ll take it room by room.

In The Bedroom

1. Make your bed on a daily basis.

Right after you get out of the bed. Not “I’m about to go to sleep, so I’m going to make my bed now.” Kerr has already debunked pretty much every excuse you’ll have about why you shouldn’t make your bed. Instead, we’ll briefly rattle off the benefits of doing so: It makes the room look neater, it keeps your comforter from your probably-not-vacuumed-recently floor and it is one less thing you’ll have to do at night. If you’re truly lazy, Kerr has given us her blessing about simplifying your bedding to just a comforter, a bottom sheet and a few pillows. You won’t have to do anything more than re-position your pillows and comforter.

2. Throw your clothes into a hamper, not on the floor.

If you’re using a laundry bag, stop. If you’re using your floor as some sort of giant hamper or closet alternative, definitely stop. A proper hamper is where dirty clothes go, immediately, until you can get them into the laundry. Obvious? Yes. Unnecessary advice for many? No.

In The Living Room

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Huffington Post Article: 6 Reasons Your Ex Hates You and What You Can Do About It

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

6 Reasons Your Ex Hates You and What You Can Do About It

By: Abby Rodman, LICSW with Huffington Post 

You tried taking the high road during your divorce. You didn’t badmouth him to the kids. You didn’t tell her parents what an awful daughter they raised. You refrained from bashing him to his boss. You didn’t slash her tires. You behaved like a grown-up. For the most part. There was that one time you… well, never mind that. It’s all in the rearview now. Your scorecard might not be perfect — but you tried.

Despite all your efforts, you can’t figure out why your ex still seems so angry at you. Why she doesn’t sit with you at your son’s Little League games or why he prefers curt text messaging to real live conversations. Maybe he still gets pleasure from launching the occasional half-veiled insult your way or she snubs you when it would take half the energy to be cordial.

In most cases, divorce brings out the worst in people: rage, pettiness, quirks and self-righteousness all go into overdrive. Here’s why your ex may be having a hard time coming off that pile of post-divorce ugliness:

1) You drove the divorce. Typically, one partner wants the divorce and the other wants to keep trying. Of course, you may have passed this baton back and forth for years until you finally cried uncle. But if you pushed to make the divorce a reality, you may be faced with an ex who now believes she is the unwitting victim of your home-wrecking awfulness.

What you can do: Unfortunately, very little without her on board. If you’re able to have a civilized sit-down with your ex, gently suggest you both lay down your gauntlets and accept the marriage wasn’t meant to be — and that, sadly, both of you are to blame for its downfall. Repeat as necessary.

2) Money, honey. Could be that things were financially okay while you were married, but now you’re both struggling. Maybe you’ve made peace with living with less while your ex is resentful he has to. If you wanted the divorce (see #1), your ex may blame you for being forced to tighten his belt.

What you can do: If possible, try not to make every convo with your ex about money. Accept it’s now on you to make your own ends meet. When financial issues arise, show him you’re willing to negotiate fairly. If it’s become your fondest objective in life to make his financially difficult, consider it may be time to focus on something healthier. (more…)

Huffington Post Article: 9 Solid Pieces Of Breakup Advice For Anyone With A Broken Heart

Friday, September 26th, 2014

9 Solid Pieces Of Breakup Advice For Anyone With A Broken Heart

By: Taryn Hillin from Huffington Post

We all know that getting over a breakup can sometimes lead to sad, lonely nights buried beneath a pile of tissues while watching “Bridget Jones’ Diary” and lip-syncing along to “All By Myself” with Bridget.

But hey, it doesn’t have to be that way. A recent Reddit thread asked users how they managed to get over their last split and the advice was pretty rock-solid. Below, 10 ways to get past the pain of a broken heart from those who have lived it.

  1. Give yourself some love. You need it. “Treat yourself with love and have patience to ride it out until the next opportunity for love comes around.”
  2. Realize that sometimes a breakup is a blessing in disguise. “In almost every case, I was glad to be done with it. I looked to the future and saw only misery. Or [my exes] looked to the future and saw only misery. Either way, it was for the best that we split. It takes time, but you know, you kind of just move on.”
  3. Find new hobbies and other ways to get your mind off the breakup. “If I slumped into phases of just sitting there wondering about her and feeling sorry for myself, I’d just free-write my thoughts in a journal for about 20 minutes, then I’d go do something completely unrelated like read a book or dive into a mindless video game. It helped to get the emotions out of my system without sitting around for hours feeling sad.”
  4. Learn to focus on the positive. “You need to remind yourself of all the positives of being by yourself and try to avoid thinking about all the negatives as much as possible.” (more…)

Huffington Post Article: 7 Ridiculously Easy Things To Do Today To Have A Better Morning

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

7 Ridiculously Easy Things To Do Today To Have A Better Morning Tomorrow

By: Huffington Post

The most common complaint about mornings is that they’re, well, mornings. We know few people who actually enjoy waking up early — even more so in the winter, where you’re greeted with bracing cold and depressing darkness. While we can’t change that, we can offer you the ridiculously easy things you can do every day for a better morning.

Prep your breakfast and lunch before you go to sleep. That’s one less thing to think about when your brain is still catching up to the rest of you.

Have your gym bag already packed. We’re assuming that if you’re reading this, you’re an after-work gym person, not an A.M. workout type. Don’t subject yourself to the indignities of hunting for smelly running shoes when you barely know what day it is.

Pick out your outfit, keep it in grabbing range. You’ll be extra thankful about this if you wake up late. It would be so nice to have your outfit picked out the night before, and hanging up ready to put on the next day.

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Huffington Post Article: The Key To Organizing Your Life Is In These 9 Simple Steps

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

The Key To Organizing Your Life Is In These 9 Simple Steps

By: Samantha Toscano for Huffington Post

Just the thought of getting organized is enough to send the even most chaos-averse among us into a tailspin. But if you can push past the heavy sighs and long groans that often bubble up at the words “plan ahead,” you’ll find that a set of weekly organizational goals aren’t as hard to accomplish as they seem.

Behold, the baby steps that will help you do it.

The Goal: Make The Bed Daily

The Shortcut: Eliminate The Extras While throw pillows are adorable, too many can make the process of making the bed longer than it needs to be — and nobody has time for that. Another time-saving trick: Ditch the top (or flat) sheet if you don’t use it, so you have one less layer to worry about.


The Goal: Organize The Closet

The Shortcut: Buy Matching Hangers Don’t worry about making those “keep,” “donate,” and “throw out” piles just yet. Before you can tackle the contents of your closet, tackle the way it’s set up. Streamlining your storage is one of the easiest ways to start. (more…)

Huffington Post Article: 7 Fights All Couples Inevitably Have And How To Resolve Them

Wednesday, September 10th, 2014

7 Fights All Couples Inevitably Have And How To Resolve Them

By: Brittany Wong for Huffington Post

Arguing with a significant other is never pretty. You may feel like each petty, overblown disagreement is breaking new ground, but the truth is, countless other couples have been there before.

Below, experts share seven of the most common arguments couples have and how to solve them before the words “split up” start getting thrown around.

  1. The need for attention Everyone wants to feel wanted and desired, but letting your S.O. know that you aren’t feeling those things can be difficult. Whatever you do, don’t keep those feelings bottled up; they could come back to hurt your relationship in serious ways, said Tammy Nelson, author of The New Monogamy: Redefining Your Relationship After Infidelity.

“The thing is, we each need our partner to show us attention and when we feel we aren’t getting enough, we can start arguments, act out, and create more problems,” Nelson said. “Most arguments that appear on the surface to be about things like flirting and jealousy are many times about the need for more attention.”

If broaching the subject proves difficult, Nelson recommended a simple exercise: “Try telling your partner three things you appreciate about them every day. And have them tell you the same,” she explained. “The focus on what your partner likes about you and what you like about them brings the attention to the relationship in a positive way, instead of increasing the conflict.”

  1. The in-laws Meddling in-laws have been a problem for couples since the dawn of time. And now that everyone is hyper-connected thanks to social media, your in-laws can take their micromanaging of your marriage to a whole new level.

What’s the fix? Both spouses need to be proactive in addressing the problem, said M. Gary Neuman, author of Connect to Love: The Keys to Transforming Your Relationship.

“The role of mediator ultimately rests with the spouse with the over-involved parent,” he said. “If something needs to be said to parents about changing their behavior, it should come from [their own kid].” (Let’s face it: There’s a greater likelihood your parents will listen up and be less resentful if you’re the one delivering the message.)

If you’re the son- or daughter-law in this equation, try to set realistic expectations for in-law relations. “You may not grow to love them like your own parents, but you do have to endeavor to like them,” Neuman said.

  1. Cellphone use If your spouse has become a tech-crazed monster who hides behind his iPhone at dinner, it might be time to establish some hard-and-fast cell phones rules, said Laura Wasser, a famed Los Angeles-based divorce attorney who has run into this issue in her own relationships. (“My ex actually referred to my cell as my ‘boyfriend.'” she admitted. “He once stormed out of a restaurant because I was texting with a client during our meal.”)

“The fact is, consideration of the person you’ve chosen to spend you some down time with has to be shown,” she said. “Think how you’d feel if you were the one sitting across the dinner table while your date was texting, reading and smirking at the phone?”

She added: “If it’s possible, leave the phone at home, in the car or turn it off during meals or movies or important conversations. If not, limit your use and apologize in advance for what might be an interruption.”

  1. Sex There’s a quote by “The Soup” host Joel McHale we love. He says that the best part about being married is “you get to have sex with your best friend.” The worst part? “When you get denied sex by your best friend.”

It’s true — nothing is more frustrating in a relationship than being on different pages when it comes to sex. To work through your issues, Nelson suggested a little game she calls, “What I make up about this.”

“When you begin to talk about your sex problems, start your discussion with the phrase ‘What I make up about this is…’ and then tell your partner how you feel about the problem,” she explained. “For instance, if the problem is not having enough sex, start off by saying, ‘The story I make up about our sex life is that we only have sex twice a week and I feel that you aren’t really into me anymore.’ When your partner’s turn comes up, you might be surprised to hear how differently he or she is interpreting things.”

Nelson said this kind of open, non-judgmental dialogue ensures that each person has a chance to air their grievances. “The focus is on understanding each person’s perspective and how to compromise, and not who’s wrong,” she said.

  1. Time spent with the kids From soccer meets five cities over to pressing diorama projects for science class, it’s nearly impossible to keep up with your kids’ to-do list. And that much more difficult if your spouse isn’t shouldering some of the responsibility.

If you’re starting to feel like a de facto single parent, it’s time you speak up, said relationship expert Marina Sbrochi, the author of Stop Looking for a Husband: Find the Love of Your Life.

“Sit down with your spouse and go over your schedule and figure out how to divide and conquer,” she said. “Even scheduling 15 minutes of uninterrupted time with your child per day can make a difference. Let dad take over bedtime and read stories. Get the kids to help with breakfast. Carve out time to have family meals together. Schedule time with your family just as you would schedule anything else in your life that is important. “

  1. Money “Marriage is about love, divorce is about money,” the old saying goes. The road to divorce, however, often begins with knock-down-drag-out fights over financial issues. (A recent Money Magazine survey showed that married couples fight over money more than anything else.)

So what should you do get a handle on money-related fights before they sabotage your marriage? Have a heart-to-heart about how each of you approach money, said financial advisor Gabrielle Clemens.

“Money is emotional and fighting can start because individuals in a relationship have different views about money,” she said. “You and your partner need to have a basic discussion about how each of your families handled money while you were growing up, covering everything from how money was spent and which parent made the financial decisions, to questions about whether they were forced to scrimp and save to have the things they needed or wanted.”

Knowing how your spouse relates to money emotionally should help you understand their perspective when fights arise, Clemens said.

  1. “Nothing” at all You know how it begins: Your spouse shouts or passively aggressively mutters, “Why are there so many dirty dishes in the sink? Can’t anyone do the dishes around but me?” Before you know it, the two of you are locked in a screaming match and neither of you willing to cave in and end it.

It’s a fight over “nothing” — where “nothing” is a stand-in for so much more, said Sbrochi.

“It’s likely masking a larger issue,” she said. “When he says, ‘why can’t anyone do the dishes,’ your mind goes back to all the times you’ve felt like nothing but a maid to your family. What’s a few dishes compared to everything you do? You’re pissed off over principles.”

The next time a seemingly insignificant issue triggers an overblown fight, Sbrochi said to pause and consider what really set you off.

“Take note of the times when nothing ends up turning into a big fight and write down what you are really feeling,” she said. “Maybe you’d like more help at home and you feel overwhelmed. Instead of suffering in silence then blowing up over something small, open up and ask for help. A great relationship is a true give and take and it begins with good communication.”


In Huffington Post’s article “7 Fights All Couples Inevitably Have And How To Resolve Them” Ms. Wong lists some areas that can cause tension at home and a few ways to resolve those problems before it becomes larger than it needs to be. The advice is well worth trying with your significant other if you feel you are in a constant battle over trivial issues.
 
If those concerns are not trivial and you need real help dealing with a difficult situation at home that you feel is beyond your control, please contact our office for assistant.
 
Law Offices of Steven B. Chroman, P. C. Santa Clarita Divorce
Call 661-255-1800 for your free initial consultation.

 

Huffington Post Article: 9 Warning Signs Your Relationship Is Headed For Collapse

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

9 Warning Signs Your Relationship Is Headed For Collapse

By: Terry Gaspard, MSW, LICSW for Huffington Post

After decades of being a therapist and lover of self-help books, I’ve come to realize that red flags usually appear fairly early on in a relationship that can signal eventual disaster if they’re not dealt with. For instance, most couples report that their relationship problems didn’t surface suddenly but are the result of buried resentment that can fester for years.

Likewise, when a couple splits, most state that their problems were rarely processed or resolved in a healthy way. As a result, they felt criticized or put down by their partner and say that they argue about the same things over and over (and over) again. In many cases, couples become detached and eventually lose fondness, admiration, and love for one another over time.

Sweeping issues under the rug only works for so long – when couples have deep-seated resentment it can be a challenge to forgive and forget. A healthy intimate relationship is built on trust and vulnerability which involves sharing your innermost feelings, thoughts, and wishes. It’s important to remember that all couples have perpetual problems and can develop tools to deal with them.

Let’s look at Katie and Brett, a couple in their mid-thirties who came to my office ready to throw in the towel because their arguments had escalated recently. Brett reported: “Katie and I fight about everything from who is taking out the trash to money problems – we throw it all into the kitchen sink when we argue. I just can’t seem to please her.” To this Katie responded: “Yeah, and his way of dealing with things is to go out with his friends and to come home late, so I end up feeling alone and hurt.”

Unfortunately, the common theme in Katie and Brett’s remarks is focusing on their mutual resentment rather than ways they can repair the relationship. According to author Claire Hatch, LCSW, “If you’re bottling up feelings of sadness or anger, you end up suppressing your feelings. You’ll find yourself feeling less joy and love, as well.” In other words, if you can’t talk about the hard things, you’ll also feel less warmth and affection; and over time less fondness and admiration for your partner.

9 Warning Signs That Your Marriage Or Relationship Is In Trouble:

  1. You argue about the same things over and over again and never seem to clear the air. You both feel like you’re the loser and that you often have to defend your position.
  2. You feel criticized and put down by your partner frequently and this leaves you feeling less than “good enough.” According to renowned relationship expert Dr. John Gottman, criticism is one of the main reasons why marriages collapse.
  3. You have difficulty being vulnerable with your significant other and when you do your worst fears are actualized – you’re left regretting that you revealed your feelings and desires.
  4. One or both of you put your children or others first. Therapist and author Andrew G. Marshall writes: “If you put your children first, day in and day out, you will exhaust your marriage.” He posits that many parents fall into the trap of putting their children first and the outcome is resentful, alienated parents and demanding, insecure children.
  5. You don’t enjoy each other’s friends or families so begin socializing away from one another. This may start out as an occasional weeknight out. But if not nipped in the bud, it can spill over into weekends – ideally when couples have an opportunity to spend more time together.
  6. You have ghosts from past relationships that surface because they were not dealt with. You may overreact to fairly innocent things your partner says or does because it triggers a memory from a past relationship.
  7. Your needs for sexual intimacy are vastly different and/or you rarely have sex. Relationship expert Cathy Meyer writes, “Whether it is him or you that has lost interest, a lack of regular intimacy in a marriage is a bad sign. Sex is the glue that binds, it is the way us adults play and enjoy each other.”
  8. You and your partner have fallen into a pursuer-distancer pattern – one of the main causes of divorce. Over time, it erodes the love and trust between you because you’ll lack the emotional and sexual intimacy that comes from being in harmony with each other.
  9. When you disagree you seldom resolve your differences. You fall into the trap of blaming each other and fail to compromise or apologize. As a result, you experience less warmth and closeness.

What are the best ways to break the negative pattern of relating that can lead to the demise of your relationship? First of all, it’s important to become conscious of your expectations. Dr. Brené Brown writes, “The fastest way for an expectation to morph into shame or resentment is for it to go unnoticed.” Dr. Brown also recommends that we drop our prerequisites for feeling worthy based on conditions – such as having our partner’s approval or a perfect relationship.

4 Things To Try Before Giving Up On Your Relationship:

  1. Stop criticizing your partner. According to Dr. John Gottman, talking about specific issues will reap better results than attacking your partner. For instance, a complaint is: “I’m upset because you didn’t tell me about the phone call from your ex. We agreed to be open with each other.” Versus a criticism: “You never tell me the truth. How can I trust you?”
  2. Practice resolving conflicts as they arise. Don’t put aside resentments that can destroy your relationship. Experiencing conflict is inevitable and couples who strive to avoid it are at risk of developing stagnant relationships. Take responsibility for your part in a dispute. Avoid defensiveness and showing contempt for your partner (rolling your eyes, ridicule, name-calling, sarcasm, etc.).
  3. Boost up physical affection and sex. According to author Dr. Kory Floyd, physical contact releases oxytocin (the bonding hormone) that reduces pain and causes a calming sensation. Studies show that it’s released during sexual orgasm and affectionate touch as well. Physical affection also reduces stress hormones – lowering daily levels of the stress hormone cortisol.
  4. Nurture fondness and admiration for your partner: Remind yourself of your partner’s positive qualities – even as you grapple with their flaws – and express your positive feelings out loud several times each day. Search for common ground rather than insisting on getting your way when you have a disagreement. Listen to their point of view and avoid stonewalling – shutting yourself off from communication.

The best way to create a relationship built on love, trust, and intimacy is to take responsibility for your own actions and to practice acceptance and compassion for your partner. The truth is that all couples have problems, even the ones who seem like a perfect match. The thing to keep in mind is that realistic expectations and damage control can keep resentment from building and causing serious relationship problems.


In Huffington Post’s article “9 Warning Signs Your Relationship Is Headed For Collapse” Terry Gaspard gives serious indications on where your marriage could be headed. The good thing is there are ways to help save your relationship and she gives advice on what to do if you feel as though you or your partner is ready to give up. The information that Ms. Gaspard gives seems easier said than done, but putting forth even just a small amount of effort can go a long way for your relationship.
 
If you feel backed into a corner and have tried everything listed in her article and still continue to undergo problems in your marriage, please contact our office. We will assist you in finding a solution to your situation.
 
Law Offices of Steven B. Chroman, P. C. Santa Clarita Divorce
Call 661-255-1800 for your free initial consultation.